Not the snappiest title……

Next year (2009) the Irish Kennel Club have been awarded the European Show by the FCI. To celebrate this the Kennel Club have decided it will be involved and they are doing this via
THE KENNEL CLUB SPECIAL CRUFTS QUALIFYING CHAMPIONSHIP SHOW FOR IRISH NATIVE BREEDS

Not the snappiest title in existence but basically it is a small Championship Show with Challenge Certificates for Irish Breeds. Until his recent death Terry Thorn was judging Glen of Imaal Terriers but now it is to be Harry O’Donoghue. Harry last judged Glens at the World Show and gave Best of Breed to Homer.

The schedule is available online at http://www.fossedata.co.uk/entry.asp?ref=KCIB_MAY_09 and a
pdf file is downloaded. Have a look at the front page of the Schedule and you may recognise a young Breege….except it isn’t it is her niece!

…..and again!

Earlier on this month it was reported that Ceilidh went Group 4 up in Scotland and it wasn’t expected another Glen of Imaal placement would be reported so quick BUT…

Congratulations to Ann and Eilish on taking Group 2 last weekend and as the show in question was a Terrier Group Show (Liverpool Terrier) it means she was RESERVE BEST IN SHOW!!!!

LIver Pigment: Is it the Dudley Terrier?

 The liver pigment that appears in some lines of Glen of Imaal Terriers is often attributed to a cross put into the breed in the Sixties but could it actually be a much earlier one?

In England the “Black Country” was known for its fighting dogs and one strain was known as the Dudley Terrier, a characteristic of which was a light coloured nose and lack of black pigment; the term “Dudley nose” appears in many Breed Standards today. This breed was held in high esteem and was especially noted for its courage, gameness and ferociousness. The late 1800s (1870 onwards) saw many Dudleys exported to “the fancy” in both Ireland and America. Indeed the 1906 Syracuse Show saw classes allocated for the Dudley Terrier so obviously the breed also came to the notice of the pedigree world.

Many current Pit Bulls still show the lack of black pigment as a direct acknowledgement to the Dudley; could “our” livers be the same?                

 

Code of Ethics (day two…the saga continues)

The standard code of ethics was easy to understand and to adhere to so would the EFG people want anything harder/more explicit or would it be apathy? Enthusiast and Fanciers people had never been backward in having opinions and this subject was no different; there were views!

The Spring Newsletter of 2006 had a provisional list of things received for consideration and discussion and Summer 2006 featured the list again with some of the questions that had come in plus further suggestions. (A mug of tea may be helpful at this point because reading is to follow)

The main five suggestions were:-

a)      NO BITCH TO HAVE A LITTER UNTIL AT LEAST 18 MONTHS HAVE PASSED SINCE THE LAST ONE

b)      NO DOG TO SIRE MORE THAN SIX LITTERS IN HIS LIFETIME

c)      NO BITCH TO BE MATED UNDER THREE YEARS OLD

d)      NO GLEN TO BE BRED FROM UNLESS THE PARENTS ARE ALSO EYE TESTED

Some of the comments received and the answers given:-

Where did the figure of 6 come from?” A dozen of the breed’s better known males had their stud careers analysed. “Better known” was defined via a wide parameter; the males had obtained a top award somewhere i.e. Glen of the Year, Puppy of the Year, Top Stud etc. so, by default probably had something to offer the breed. To ensure a fair sample the dog that has sired the highest number of registered litters, 18, was also included. Despite this remarkably high number the average number of litters sired by arguably the breed’s senior males was 6.1.

 

“Would it not be a better idea if the litters were “spread”? One at ten months and five before aged three would mean all six had happened before a valid (as of this time) certificate is obtained.” This is a very valid point and like the number of 6 is put for discussion

 

“A Glen male not used as a youngster would be as much use as a chocolate fireguard!” This is why the suggestion was put with a number rather than an age. The single younger “proving” litter has been a tradition in Glens in this country since the early 80s.

 

All responsible breeders have waited until a bitch is over two for a long time now before having a litter. Some vets advise having a first litter under the age of three so wouldn’t 2.5 years be better? Glens have an eye problem, Glens mature late. Would waiting another six months really hurt?

 

Why 18 months between litters?” The idea behind this is a damage limitation exercise in case the worst happens. Recently two seven year old & a nine year old have been diagnosed as affected with PRA. IF they had been mated every 12 months (which is common in some breeds) from the age of 3 there could have been 15 litters that were now all classified as carriers. If mated every 18 months there would only have been nine. It is appreciated that this is an extreme example and very, very few people mate their Glen bitches every twelve months but it does get over what the difference those few months could mean to the breed as a whole.

 

“Some imported animals don’t have tested parents!” .It is appreciated that testing history has to start somewhere but eye testing in Glens is now ten years old and the bulk of responsible Glen breeders have been connected, in some form, with the practice for at least five years. The question must be asked “When the risks are known why import a Glen without tested parents?” Also though there has to be kudos for starting a testing regime. As the suggestion is from a Code of Best Practice for UK Glens should only UK bred animals be covered by the clause?

 

“All affected Glens should be removed totally from the breeding pool!” One word, yes.

 

“What will be the situation with regard to carriers?” Some people would never ever breed with a carrier, others are willing to take the gamble. In an ideal world they wouldn’t be bred from but the Glen gene pool is small. Should this be up to the individual as long as everything is properly taken into account and prospective owners told?

 

I suggest that both dog & bitch, when mated, should have a valid eye test no more than fifteen months old maximum”. Good suggestion.

 

“It is appreciated that this is a suggested BREEDING Code but I think it should include somewhere that Glens need testing to the age of nine”.

 

“Okay, at the moment it seems to be agreed that the first valid eye test is likely to be around 3 so why should I spend money earlier?” Glens do seem to have late onset PRA but we need to keep on top of things so one or two earlier tests can’t hurt.

 

“I already do most of this so what exactly will it do for me?” Signing up to a Code Of Best Practice agreed by the breed shows publicly that you, & the breed, care. Put it on your breed literature, on your business card. Health is a “biggie” these days so be proud to demonstrate that you are giving it the best shot you can. As one pet owner said “anything that lengthens the odds a bit can’t be that bad!”

 

Something that may already have been noticed is that a “Code Of Best Practice” is being referred to rather than a Code of Ethics. Late in 2005 it had been pointed out that a Code of Ethics was about behaviour and whilst the EFG had just the easy code that they had, and everybody was civilised after all, there would be no problem with it but something more intense…… How could the EFG, originally born out of the belief that everybody had a right to know what was going on and with debate, argument and contrasting views being central to its core ideals have something that could go against that? The health of the Glen was being talked about but there are different ideas on how best to go about it; just look across to America. Thus the idea came up of the Code of Best Practice. Something that would be decided by the EFG people for the intended better breeding of Glen of Imaal Terriers in regard to PRA and it would be up to each EFG individual to personally decide it was for them. Revoluntionary maybe but it was checked with the Kennel Club and they agreed that a Code of Ethics was not enforceable in law so anything that was agreed by the members……

So the Enthusiasts and Fanciers of Glens has a Code of Ethics PLUS a Code of Best Practice. The Code of Ethics can be seen in yesterday’s blog. The finalised 2006 Code of Best Practice, in no particular order) is below

a)   NO BITCH TO HAVE A LITTER UNTIL AT LEAST 18 MONTHS HAVE PASSED   SINCE THE LAST ONE (no mating will take place unless the bitch has an uptodate eye test)

b)  NO DOG TO SIRE MORE THAN SIX LITTERS IN HIS LIFETIME(his eye test always to be up to date)

c)  NO BITCH TO BE MATED UNTIL THE SEASON AROUND HER THIRD BIRTHDAY(after a clear at this time eye test)

d)   NO UK BORN GLEN TO BE BRED FROM UNLESS THE PARENTS ARE ALSO EYE TESTED

e)   A PRA AFFECTED GLEN WILL BE REMOVED FROM THE GENE POOL AND NEVER BRED FROM ONCE DIAGNOSIS IS MADE

f)   IF A GLEN OF IMAAL TERRIER IS DEFINED AS A KNOWN CARRIER IT WILL ONLY BE USED FOR BREEDING WITH THE FULL KNOWLEDGE & AGREEMENT OF THE OWNER OF THE ANIMAL IT IS MATED TO AND THE POSSIBLE FULL CONSEQUENCES WILL BE EXPLAINED TO THE OWNERS OF ANY PUPPIES WHICH MAY RESULT.

Code of Ethics(the FIRST two day blog)

For many health has always been important in regard to their dogs but after a certain documentary that seemed to say differently HEALTH has now become big time news. The Code of Ethics that the Kennel Club sent out has recently appeared on here and the EFG has been asked what it is doing/what it has as it is “only” Kennel Club recognised, not registered.

In many eyes the EFG recognition rather than registration could be seen as a boon. The Code of Ethics that was sent out has caused a lot of disquiet because it ignores stirling work done by breed clubs for their own breeds and reduces everything to the lowest common denominator. If you are registered at the KC this Code has to be adopted but as the Enthusiasts and Fanciers of Glens isn’t……

This doesn’t mean we aren’t on the ball though and health has featured very prominently for a while now but first things first. The EFG has always had a very simple Code of Ethics and this was drawn up intentionally because under UK law Codes of Ethics have no legal standing so filling it full of things that could cause arguments when they couldn’t be enforced was just plain ridiculous

Charge realistic prices according to pet or show quality.

 

Never sell any puppy for indiscriminate breeding.

 

All puppies to be insured and wormed.

 

All puppies over 12 weeks to be vaccinated.

 

To give after sales service as long as is practically possible-even for life.

 

Never refuse to take back any animal at any age.

 

To fully inform all prospective owners of the problems, as well as the virtues, of owning a terrier with a strong heritage.

 

To only export the best possible and most suitable puppy in each litter.

 

Always remember the breed standard.

Easy and never caused any problems!

In 2004 the BVA and KC showed signs that they were starting to listen to us and take notice of the PRA work and testing that was being done worldwide. In 2005 word was received that an apllication was being made for Glen of Imaal Terriers to finally go onto Schedule A for eye-testing. In other words the UK powers that be were finally waking up to the fact that there was a problem. To acknowledge this it was decided to improve the Code of Ethics and late 2005 the word went out that in 2006, to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of the EFG, there would be a free debate as to the way forward to do the best we could in assisting the PRA fight and if anybody had any thoughts let us know.

Tomorrow will reveal what was thought and more importantly what was decided!

No, Glen of Imaal Terriers DO NOT cost that much!!

Forgive the shouting but at least you have been spared the swearing. My words weren’t too anglo-saxon to the caller on the phone who wished to get a comment about the litter of Glen of Imaal Terriers in the paper that would fetch over £1,700 pounds. When the phone was put down my language was VERY graphic.

After the farce of earlier this year with “Rarer Than Giant Panda’s” it was hoped the subject was finished but seemingly not if money is involved so

Glen of Imaal Terriers are not rare

Glen of Imaal Terriers are not that difficult to get hold of

Glen of Imaal Terriers do not cost £1,700

Glen of Imaal Terriers have considerably more than a thousand worldwide. The overall population has never been so high

and jus as an aside Glen of Imaal Terriers with a liver nose may be great animals but aren’t usually bredfrom!

PRA Fund Raising

In the Summer (yes there was one) t shirts were worn with the PRA Fund Raising slogan on. The sweatshirts are being worn now but what about Christmas? Why not help raise a bit more money by sending a fund raising Christmas Card?

Admittedly great aunt Martha may look a bit surprised to get a card with a group of dogs on but why not consider them for your canine friends? We all know how important health is and for Glen of Imaal Terriers the discovery of the PRA gene is right at the top of the heap. Currently the cards are available with either traditional trees or a more modern coloured setting. Drop Jean jean@e-f-g.co.uk an email and they will be with you in time for Christmas posting….even overseas.

Dog Of The Year

Dogs Today are running their Dog of the Year Competition. below is one of the nominees. If you would like to vote for him drop an email to the following beverley@dogstodaymagazine.co.uk and put DOG OF THE YEAR as the subject.

Paddy, a Glen of Imaal Terrier owned by Ryan Gough from Aberdare, Rhondda
Six-year-old Ryan is autistic. He doesn’t like to interact with other people, and he is reluctant to speak or play. However, when Paddy came along four years ago, there was an instant connection. Within three days, Ryan was calling Paddy’s name and they are now inseparable.
“Now, Ryan will initiate communication with Paddy – which is a big thing with autism,” says mum Gaynor. “The first thing that Ryan does in the morning is call for Paddy – and then he calls Cassie, our other Glen of Imaal, and then the cat. And they all go up into the bedroom to see him!” The only other things that Ryan will ask for are his basic needs, such as a drink or a biscuit.
Ryan will also play with Cassie – something he does with no other child or adult.

A change of direction…..

Dogs and doggy things have been mused, discussed and enjoyed for months now but how about something different? The new Bond, Quantum of Solace is due out on the 31st and the theme tune is getting airplay. Nithing though will evr compare to Tom Jones, Shirley Bassey or this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3rqS98seNA

The Thunderball theme that didn’t make the cut: James Bond…..the Cowboy!